Since the inception of the NYU Center for Data Science (CDS) in 2013, we have developed two graduate programs. The first program was our Master of Science in Data Science and most recently, in Fall 2017, we accepted our inaugural class of PhD in Data Science students. As a result of this growth, we have developed an internal recruitment, placement, and networking initiative. This initiative includes company information sessions, career fairs, networking happy hours, amongst other types of events connecting students with employers.

In addition, students have access to the Wasserman Center at NYU, which provides career development services to the entire university. The NYU Center for Data Science supplements their efforts by having events where CDS students can network with employers specifically about Data Science.

Company Information Session

CDS organizes internal Company Information Sessions during the Fall and Spring semesters. This is an opportunity for a single company to visit the Center for Data Science (CDS) to gain exposure and speak to CDS students in-person. The purpose of this event is for the company to explain who they are and what they do. They can talk about the company’s data science initiatives and goals and maybe include some interesting projects they are working on. It is also an opportunity to communicate about what it is like to work at that company by discussing company culture and a “day in the life” as a Data Scientist at the organization.

CDS Recruiting Event/Career Fair

This event is for companies that have full-time jobs or internship opportunities available under the data science umbrella. They are similar to job fairs but much smaller. We have about 5-8 companies that are currently recruiting come to CDS and have one-on-one conversations with our students. Students have a chance to hear about a company, its data science initiatives, and job openings

Job Titles

CDS Alumni are usually able to start in their desired position title straight out of the MS program. Examples of job titles that our students currently hold are the following:

  • Senior Data Scientist
  • Data Scientist
  • Research Scientist
  • Research Analyst
  • Software Engineer
  • Research Engineer
  • Data Analyst
  • Machine Learning Engineer
  • Natural Language Processing Engineer

 

Employment Statistics Based on Self Reports:

  • The graduating class of 2015 had a 100% placement rate upon graduation.
  • The graduating class of 2016 had a 42% conversion rate from internship to full-time offer within a company.
  • The industry breakdown based on self-reports from the 2015 and 2016 graduating class is the following:

Industry Breakdown:

  1. Finance: 37%
  2. Technology: 45%
  3. Media/Marketing: 12%
  4. Health/Medicine: .04%
  5. Social Good: .02%
  6. Other (PhD or Research): 5.94%

Track Breakdown for Fall 2017 Incoming MS in Data Science

  1. Data Science General – 24.04%
  2. Big Data – 24.04%
  3. Mathematics & Data – 13.46%
  4. Natural Language Processing – 4.81%
  5. Physics – 1.92%

 

Mean GRE Scores for Fall 2017 Incoming MS in Data Science
Quantitative%(Percentile) = 93.17 167.58
Verbal %(Percentile) = 73.77 157.36
Analytical Writing%(Percentile) = 44.72     3.65
Mean TOEFL Score = 105.93
Mean Undergraduate GPA = 3.69

Sex Breakdown

  1. Males – 61.50%
  2. Females – 38.50%

 

 

Are You a Data Scientist?

Data scientists have stellar mathematical, computer science and analytical skills. Curiosity is also an essential characteristic of a data scientist. They approach the structured and unstructured data pouring in from sources such as sensors, the Web, smartphones and credit card readers, to name just a few, with an explorer’s desire to uncover what others might not see. They also excel in presenting complicated findings in order for experts and non-experts alike to make use of insights gleaned from data.

Data scientists work in a wide range of sectors: technology, healthcare, finance, management, government. They are also in high demand. A McKinsey Global Institute study, for instance, projects that by 2018 the United States will face a shortage of approximately 140,000 to 190,000 people with the skills of data scientists. https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/digital-mckinsey/our-insights/big-data-the-next-frontier-for-innovation

 

The Perfect Data Science City

A particularly large number of companies in the Greater New York City area are driven by data science, including IBM, AT&T, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, EMC, Thompson-Reuters, Foursquare, bit.ly, Etsy and Twitter. The city’s pharmaceutical, financial and insurance industries also rely on data science. This puts students in proximity to desirable organizations and to careers with leaders in the field after graduation. Additionally, these companies, along with city agencies awash in datasets, may be involved in research projects students will participate in during the program.